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Saturday, December 22, 2007

What the heck are yous drinking for Eggnog in the UK?


I noted in the Christmas memes that went around most Americans seem to like eggnog, while most in the UK gave it a "not only no, but HELL, NO" rating. Someone referred to a "bright yellow concoction." All I can think is that someone, somewhere got something very, very wrong! If your eggnog is brighter than the yellow depicted here...then yes, something is wrong. If it even tastes of egg, then yes, something is wrong.

15 comments:

tara said...

Thanks alot! Looking at those pictures makes me want egg nog--and I want it served in those glasses--sheesh, guess I'll break down and buy a pint--perhaps we should send some American nog over to the UK!

Esther said...

Karen, you sure you're not from NY or NJ? :-) I noticed that too re: UK vs. Eggnog. I don't like it from the cartons in the supermarkets but homemade it's pretty tasty.

gemoftheocean said...

Esther, get the heck out, the "yous" musta tipped you off. I hail from Allentown, Pa. I thought "yous guys" was standard English until I moved to Virginia when I was eight-and-a-half. Now talk about people who "talk funny."

"Y'all come back!" WHO "y'all? it's just me!"

The phrase "get the heck out" is still a favorite phrase used by my Lehigh Valley relatives. (You've probably been to Dorney Park, sometime in your life.) The phrase covers ALL events - as in:

Did you hear Hess's Department store has a sale on girdles for $4.99? "Get the heck out."

Did you hear Paulie crashed 3 wedding receptions last week and he didn't even know whose weddings they were? "Get the heck out."

There was a huge landslide in Botswana and 400,000 people got wiped out. "Get the heck out."

I am almost sorry I wasn't around Aug. 6, 1945. "Yeah, a whole city got vaporized." "Get the heck out."

Mrs Jackie Parkes MJ said...

YUK! Glad i'm a pioneer! lol

leutgeb said...

Looks interesting, like custard.

What's in it?

Mulled wine is my favourite at this time of year.

Ma Beck said...

Gem,
No self-respecting Southerner would use "y'all" when addressing one person.
Y'all is a contraction of you all and may only be used when addressing two or more.
Only a Yankee poseur would do such a thing. And I have witnessed this.

;)

Vincenzo said...

I love it (with rum and nutmeg).

leutgeb wrote:
"What's in it?"

Here's a recipe.

gemoftheocean said...

Vincenzo -- that is a Cadillac of a recipe!!!

Leutgeb & Jackie, it can be made with or without alcohol. There are recipes with and without. Leutgeb - have it after a musical performance and not before. :-D BTW, I think the French Horn always seemed the coolest instrument. If I was going to learn a brass instrument, that would have been the one.

Nutmeg is a usual ingredient either way.

As far as the supermarket brands. Some are pretty good...but I wouldn't buy anything that was bright yellow! I like mine with a good tang of nutmeg so I can taste that, but not to the point of overpowering. And depending on my mood I'll put a little light rum in, or not.

a thorn in the pew said...

"Yankee poseur"...lol. My son adores the nawg. Here in Kentucky, we say "ya'll" and it is multi-purpose. We recently started using "butter my butt and call me a biscuit!" but it is only because it sounds like something someone in KY would say. We have the tradition of oyster stew on Christmas Eve. Someone said it's a Dutch tradition.

gemoftheocean said...

Thorn: I am going to appropriate that saying! And oyster stew sounds perfectly perfect.

I try and have mushroom soup Christmas eve....which reminds me, I better go buy some fresh mushrooms before they're all gone!

Karen

Esther said...

Karen: LOL! Where I come from it's "You guys" and "Get outta here"

Makes me homesick for Northern NJ :-)

BTW, I made oyster stew for Christmas Eve one year. I had to add potatoes because it seemed to plain just cream and oysters :-)

Stephen said...

There isn't really any traditional Christmas drink in our house - mulled wine was for Bonfire Night (and, as a mostly non-drinker, I don't like that much either). My family tend towards large quantities of red wine on Christmas Day; I stick to cranberry juice!

My particular loathing is reserved for Starbucks' Christmas beverages - stuff like Gingerbread latté. I find the thought process that tastes a cup of coffee and decides that what it really needs is gingerbread slightly disturbing. Some tastes just aren't meant to go together.

gemoftheocean said...

I like cranberry juice too. It was an acquired taste as I got older. Gingerbread mitt coffee! What can they be thinking.

Drinking Quantro with salt beef and mustard, is of course gastronomically wrong. And don't ever eat curry with custard, you'll find that it never stays down very long. Don't drink champagne through soggy old slippers, though this barbaric custom is rife....avoid eating goulash with ice cream and kippers.

Vincenzo said...

"I like cranberry juice too. It was an acquired taste as I got older. Gingerbread mitt coffee! What can they be thinking.

Drinking Quantro with salt beef and mustard, is of course gastronomically wrong. And don't ever eat curry with custard, you'll find that it never stays down very long. Don't drink champagne through soggy old slippers, though this barbaric custom is rife....avoid eating goulash with ice cream and kippers."


Stop it you're making me hungry!

gemoftheocean said...

Vincenzo---apologies to Cyril Ritchard on that last one...Barnes and Nobel semi-failed me for the audio clip.

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